Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

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Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

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Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

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A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Thursday, July 29, 2010

More Metal Dolls and other Fine Things

We finally have a beautiful, sunny day where we are not being steamed like dumplings! I have been participating in plannning craft get-to-gethers, and will, of course, find ways to incorporate dolls and miniatures. I was eyeing my snapdragons and remembering a Kimport article promotoing dolls made from the dried seed pods of these flowers. I am still fighting the squirrels for my outdoor miniature terrariums, too. I recently renewed my library card, and find it helps with stress to visit our closest branch to look for my favorite mystery writers. This week, I found Barbara Collins and Joanne Fluke. I love reading the so-called "hobby" and antiques series which include Deb Baker, Laura Childs, Monica Ferris, Margaret Grace, Sharon Fiffer, Tamar Myers, and several others. I am also enamored of Mary Kay Andrews, and the "darker" stories of Elizabeth George, Patrica Cornwell, Tami Hoag, Minette Walters, Colin Dexter, and R.D. Wingfield. These, of course, are merely the tip of the ice berg. Below, another excerpt from the Metal Doll Book. I hope you enjoy it, and that you find a time to find me on Twitter and Facebook. Till next time:

Conclusion: What Next?

I love history! Dolls are history. They have had an impact on life throughout time, from emotional youngsters
getting one as a gift to impacting whole economies . . .

Jim and Joan Radke, JnJ Dolls

In an allusion to the legendary statue of Memnon and the theory that Ancient Egyptian statues had souls, Rilke has written that dolls were fed and made alive through children's imagination like the "Ka" of the Egyptians is fed on imaginary food.
Some doll makers, however, were not content with inanimate dolls that only lived through the power of a child's imagination. They strove to make dolls so lifelike that they could actually imitate human movement and sound. Formanek-Brunell and Kuznets would have us believe that there were serious gender differences among doll makers, and that male toy makers saw the dolls they made as extensions of both themselves and the machines that they created. Thus, even female dolls had male anatomy and characteristics, and like their creators, they were made of hard, efficient substances. These tiny human impostors were not meant so much for love, as durability.
In any case, the doll, as cultural artifact, is our "double," the other which both repels and attracts us. It perplexes us that something so "dead," can also be so alive, and that something the modern world has relegated to the toy box can have such a rich and complicated history.
Dolls will continue to be made as long as there are human beings to conceive of new designs for them. They will continue to reign predominantly in the children's realm, though individual adults and museums will still collect them as tangible artifacts of human history, miniature representations of humanity for their respective ages.
Metal dolls, while still not prized in most important collections, may have the richest history of all. From the golden idols of the Inca and Aztecs, to the toy soldiers of lead and silver and the Minerva and Juno heads of the last century, metal dolls could form a fascinating collection in themselves. It is hoped that this book will inspire others to take up the "iron" gauntlet and add to the dialog that I hope this research has created. Until then, to all who are interested in doll history and doll collecting, Happy "Dolling," with love from Tin Lizzie.
November 1999, The Eve of the Millennium

Monday, July 26, 2010

Visiting Mr. McGregor's Iowa

Took a rare trip today with my dad. We used to travel all the time when my mom was with us. It was bittersweet, and nostalgic. We visited McGregor, Iowa, to see the antique mall with 6000 dolls. It was worth the trip, and the river towns on the Mississippi bluffs are breath taking. I'd like to go again and visit the mounds and other attractions. McGregor is all antiques. Then, on do Dyersville, where I was glad to see Plaza Antiques is still around. My only glitches; I was charged regular price for a vintage Kewpie after the sign said it was half price at 100 years Past. I left a message for the owner, and I'm sure we can work it out. And, no one in business wants to use debit cards or credit cards. If an item is discounted in the store, you lose the discount if you use plastic. In one mall, they charged fifty cents to use their restroom if you didn't buy anything. They had signs up all over thanking people for "putting up with them." I see their point, but this is not the way to attract people to your shop. Also, it was very dark in most of the booths. There was also no one around to open cases, so I jettisoned serously considering anything locked up. But, the selection was good, and over all the people I did find were friendly. I looked for the old fashioned candy store advertised, but I couldn't find it.

I found Schoenhut in need of some TLC, and some nice doll pins and small dolls. Also, found a nice Shoenhut bisque clown head, and a Campble Kid ornament, and the Kewpie mentioned earlier. I also bought two carved fetish or idol dolls. One Japanese,one polynesian. Both were very unusual. I recommend the trip, and would like to take it again. It would have helped if my glasses hadn't snapped right before I had to leave. My old glasses didn't cut it, so not only was it dark, I couldn't see much of the time! Still, we had a good time. The river itself this time of year is quite an attraction. Happy Dolling and Antiquing! Till Next Time.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

British Museum II

Here are some of the graphics from the museum which as acceptable to print and use for nonprofit purposes. They are excellent examples of ethnic and ancient dolls, many won't be seen anywhere else.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

British Museum

This is a wonderful cyber place for collectors. Great online galleries and exhibits, and copy free photos which are usable for nonprofit, non commercial purposes. Each object has a history and a place to comment. It's terrific!

Saturday, July 17, 2010

More collections I don't collect!

I left out some more, so here they are:

Books - I never set out to collect them. The only books I sought out to keep had to do with dolls or paper dolls. My mother's love of books rubbed off on me. She never threw out a book; I rescued one about GWTW that was badly burned. I have given my share a way, and sold a few, but I make sure they go to good homes. My mom introduced me to library sales; she was great at picking out reference books on eclectic subjects. She might mention I had too much of other things, but she never complained about books.

Hankies: Again, my mom, and grandma who crocheted the edges,taught me to love good hankies. They are hard to find now, though one antique shop and a hardware store have them here. I even miss their boxes.I actually used them and washed them well, ironed them, etc., when I was younger. I have favorite sunbonnet patterns and printed examples, tattled examples, silk, men's, lace, miniature. I dress tiny dolls in them and use them as dollhouse bedspreads. Some are even turned into dolls. A few have found their way on quilts.

Quilting, weaving, sewing kits and supplies. These are collected inadvertently, to be used. But, many kits and patterns in themselve are interesting and speak of a certain time.

Albums and boxes; These are of all types, and they hold other treasures. They are collections by necessity. Also, glass jars and cannisters of all types, because they can hold different treasures.

Socks and stockings; the wilder the better, since they are my favorite fashion accessory. Ditto shoes, my second favorite fashion accessory.

Purses and handbags, especially Gucci. I started out with a few miniatures, and my grandmother's reticule. I was always exposed to them, and have a couple old Greek bags, and some ancient wicker hand totes. I love to carry different ones. They became a default collection. Would love to stumble on a Birken, as I once snagged a Chanel at a yard sale.

Next time, new photos and lists of things I do collect! More from The History of Metal Dolls.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Scary Stuff and Collections of Things I don't Collect!

It's been one of those weeks, mornings, days. Let the stress begin in waves and tsunamis. So, now a pause to blog, inspired after reading the wonderful Sharon Fiffer's, Scary Stuff, featuring antique Halloween decorations! Ms. Fiffer has an amazing website and blog for mystery lovers, pickers, and collectors, alike. Below is my list of collections of things I don't collect, a private joke between me and one of my friends:

1. Guitar picks [accumulated, then diversified, out of necessity]
2. Sheet music and music books [ditto]
3. Small kitchen gadgets [often gifts too interesting or bizarre to toss]
4. Key chains [except when theme or doll related] I bought the entire collection, fits in two boxes, of a neighbor's deceased son. The whole thing was very poignant, and I felt it could be used to decorate a tree for The Festival of Trees, locally.
5. Rocks, inherited
6. Teacups, also inherited
7. Vintage greeting cards, inherited
8. Family memorabilia; I've been unofficially designated the curator for several family histories
9. Pencils and pens, many souvenirs, all used
10. Jewelry, hated it at first, then inherited, now, well, OK, it's no longer an "involuntary" collection.
11. Tupperware
12. Mixing bowls
13. Copper
14. Cameras and photmemorabilia
15. Orchids [only fake and information about live one's; I'm too scared to grow them]
16. "Garden junk" - Necessity, my neighbor's enthusiasm, desire to decorate and grow things.
17. Stickers
18. True crime and books about murders [occupational hazard]
19. Antique, once valuable, beat-up books without homes; this one is emotional.
20. Beads/art supplies; another occupational hazard
21. Newspaper clippings, unless on dolls or relevant themes. My aunt got me started. Became valuable teaching tools. Will organize my ephemera collection when I retire.
22. Wine corks and labels; former as souvenirs, latter because my uncle was a commercial artist who designed them.
23. Quilt squares and vintage materials; inherited and occupational hazard. Also, tribute to my grandmother and my mother.
24. Auto and trip memorabilia, assorted cartography; many trips of days gone by, same for airline, cruise line, and a few train pieces.

Well, that pretty much covers it. There are, of course, the "conscious" collections of which I'm very fond, and the 'side' or derivative collections, but more of them later.

Happy dolling, collecting, and weekend!

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Dolls by Bettina

I was browsing the web today for articles on toys and The Holocaust,and stumbled on a blog that was denigrating one of my favorite doll books, a miniature, doll-sized volume called Dolls by an artist, Bettina. The book is a story told to a small girl who is asking for a doll. The person who answers talks about all types of dolls, famous antiques, foreign dolls, home made dolls and clowns. She is teaching the little girl about dolls, and the child finally says she just wants "dolls, just dolls to love." The book is illustrated in charming watercolors and is very sweet. Well, the blog today knew nothing about dolls. He made fun of the authors name, and insinuated that the French fashion doll illustrated was promoting prostitution. He called other dolls racist and accused the author of perpetuating racists and negative stereotypes. He doesnt'know dolls or collectors. Dolls is a child's book, written in the early 60s. It is meant to introduce young children to antique and collectible dolls. The sheer diversity is entrancing. My copy came from a great department and stationery store we used to have here. They had doll books,and wonderful dolls on display upstairs. I loved it. This nasty blog showed what a little ignorance can do to someone's innocent hobby. My comment, educate yourself and get a life, and don't insult someone else's ethnic art.

My rant for tonight. Inspite of the Scrooges and missions organizaion and reducation out there,happy dolling!

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Fennimore Museum 2

I would like to thank my friends at the Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum who have listed my name on a plaque and in their Recognition Book as a Friend of the Museum. This is a wonderful place, with an excellent collection of over 3000 dolls. They have moved to a new location across from the Railroad Museum, and the two museums make a wonderful family trip destination. They are near other attractions, including The Dickleyville Grotto and The House on the Rock. A visit including The Wisconsin Dells makes a lovely weekend trip.

But, the Doll and Toy Museum, my sister attraction, is a worthy place all its own. The director and officers are very generous with their time. They are eager to share the 700+ custom dressed Barbie Collection, and the toy collection donated by Pixar animator, Jeff Pidgeon. There are fantastic dolls and toys donated from local collectors, and a Fisher Price Popeye toy that represents the first toy patented by the popular company. The good thing about this museum is its diversity; there is something for everyone. There are even board games and other tops that children can play with hands on. Currently, there is a themed exhibit involving The Beatles. Baby Boomers will have a field day as they remember their favorite toys. Adults will awe over the beatiful dolls and accessories in the gift shop, as well as the nice selection of books.

The Friends of the Museum also thank Subway for its generosity and kindness in helping with providing a building for the new facility. We hope the Museum is open for many long and happy years. Look for more posts about this and other museums in Wisconsin.

Wednesday, July 7, 2010

Fennimore Doll Museum, Fennimore, WI

Happy 4th of July, one day removed! Coming attractions; photo from Dr.E's trip to the wonderful Fennimore Doll Museum, in Fennimore, WI. This is one of the friendliest, happiest, most attractive doll museums I've visited. Check out their site and Gumby Blog. More information to come. Happy Fireworks!