Children of Japan

Children of Japan
Courtesy, R. John Wright

The Jumeau 201

The Jumeau 201
Courtesy Theriault's and Antique Doll Collector Magazine

Hinges and Hearts

Hinges and Hearts
An Exhibit of our Metal Dolls

Google+ Followers

Tuxedo and Bangles

Tuxedo and Bangles

A History of Metal Dolls

A History of Metal Dolls
Now on Alibris.com and In Print! The First Book of its Kind

Alice, Commemorative Edition

Alice, Commemorative Edition
Courtesy, R. John Wright

Translate

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory

Emma, aka, La Contessa Bathory
Her Grace wishes us all a Merry Christmas!

Annabelle

Annabelle

Emma Emmeline

Emma Emmeline
Our New Addition/fond of stuffed toys

Cloth Clown

Cloth Clown

Native American Art

Native American Art

the triplets

the triplets

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby

c. 1969 Greek Plastic Mini Baby
Bought Athens on the street

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Iron Maiden; Middle Ages

Sand Baby Swirls!

Sand Baby Swirls!
By Glenda Rolle, courtesy, the Artist

Glenda's Logo

Glenda's Logo
Also, a link to her site

Sand Baby Castaway

Sand Baby Castaway
By Glenda Rolle, Courtesy the Artist

A French Friend

A French Friend

Mickey

Mickey
From our friends at The Fennimore Museum

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll

2000+ year old Roman Rag Doll
British Museum, Child's Tomb

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll

Ancient Egypt Paddle Doll
Among first "Toys?"

ushabti

ushabti
Egyptian Tomb Doll 18th Dynasty

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

Ann Parker Doll of Anne Boleyn

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Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase

Tin Head Brother and Sister, a Recent Purchase
Courtesy, Antique Daughter

Judge Peep

Judge Peep

Hakata Doll Artist at Work

Hakata Doll Artist at Work
From the Museum Collection

Follow by Email

Japanese Costume Barbies

Japanese Costume Barbies
Samurai Ken

Etienne

Etienne
A Little Girl

Happy Heart Day

Happy Heart Day

From "Dolls"

From "Dolls"
A Favorite Doll Book

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Jenny Wren

Jenny Wren
Ultimate Doll Restorer

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Our Friends at The Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum

Baby Boo 1960s

Baby Boo 1960s
Reclaimed and Restored as a childhood Sabrina the Witch with Meow Meow

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dr. E's on Display with sign

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum

Dolls Restored ad New to the Museum
L to R: K*R /celluloid head, all bisque Artist Googly, 14 in. vinyl inuit sixties, early celluloid Skookum type.

Two More Rescued Dolls

Two More Rescued Dolls
Late Sixties Vinyl: L to R: Probably Horseman, all vinyl, jointed. New wig. R: Effanbee, probably Muffy, mid sixties. New wig and new clothing on both. About 12 inches high.

Restored Italian Baby Doll

Restored Italian Baby Doll
One of Dr. E's Rescued Residents

Dolls on Display

Dolls on Display
L to R: Nutcrackers, Danish Troll, HItty and her book, Patent Washable, Mechanical Minstrel, Creche figure, M. Alexander Swiss. Center is a German mechanical bear on the piano. Background is a bisque German costume doll.

A Few Friends

A Few Friends
These dolls are Old German and Nutcrackers from Dr. E's Museum. They are on loan to another local museum for the holidays.

Vintage Collage

Vintage Collage
Public Domain Art

The Merry Wanderer

The Merry Wanderer
Courtesy R. John Wright, The Hummel Collection

The Fennimore Doll Museum

The Fennimore Doll Museum

Robert

Robert
A Haunted Doll with a Story

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

Halloween Dolls Displayed in a Local Library

The Cody Jumeau

The Cody Jumeau
Long-faced or Jumeau Triste

German Princesses

German Princesses
GAHC 2005

A Little PowerRanger

A Little PowerRanger
Halloween 2004

The Island of the Dolls

The Island of the Dolls
Shrine to Dolls in Mexico

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death

Based on the Nutshell Series of Death
Doll House murder

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A lovely dress

A lovely dress

Raggedy Ann

Raggedy Ann
A few friends in cloth!

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI

Fennimore Doll and Toy Museum, WI
Pixar Animator's Collection

Little PM sisters

Little PM sisters
Recent eBay finds

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Dressed Mexican Fleas

Really old Dolls!

Really old Dolls!

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Monday, June 25, 2012

We're Back!

I hardly know where to begin. I've fallen behind in my posts because I can't add new posts on my main computer. Very strange. I'm not sure what losing no draft blog, or something, means, either. Today was another long, slogging day, but it was lovely out, and is now very cool as I sit and write. There have been many exciting things happening in the doll world and in the museum world. We put up a dollhouse shaped large bookshelf which looks very nice. I spent some time this weekend dressing dolls that need it, and rearranging. I've noticed trends in black dolls becoming more popular, and more vintage seventies and eighties dolls are showing up in antique malls, and thrift shops. I went to one yard sale where there were two large dolls dressed in Victorian silk outfits with wooden stands were onsale for fifty cents each. One is pink, one is lavender. The dolls are over three foot and appear to be Uneeda. We are looking for any information on metal dolls or mechanical dolls. I was also lucky enough to find some issues of Doll Castle News from the late seventies, early eighties. I was thinking of more collections of things I don't collect, and came up with Rumer Godden books, which I'm looking for as conference paper sources, pencils and pens as souvenirs, vintage material and ribbon to make things, political memorabilia, Black memorabilia, some horse and dog figurines, cat artifacts. Once the collectors bug bites you, you can get rabid! Also, good books on law and criminal justice; love to read them! I am rereading A Little Princess and The Dolls House by Godden. The former is by Burnett, of course. Also want to reread Miss Happiness and Miss Flower. Here is a draft of a review I am writing: I welcome comments.Childhood in World History. Peter N. Stearns New York: Routledge, Second Edition, 2011 Contents, Preface, Further Reading, Index 179 pp. $29.95 paper ISBN 978-0415598095 Stearns delivers his message using a clear, concise vocabulary, which avoids professional jargon. Though he uses many sociological and anthropological studies in his book, he does not regurgitate the statistics and professional lingo, which often plague these types of works. Instead, Stearns recognizes that his readers are interested in the overall information his sources have to deliver. He sets the agenda clearly in his introduction where he writes that his is not “just the history of childhood, but the world history of childhood, and this adds some additional spice” (7), Obviously, as the author of several titles in the Themes in World History Series, Professor Stearns has proved he is also an expert in his field. Moreover, there are many sources on the history of childhood, but few that address it in the context of world history and the effects of globalization. Many of the references Stearns lists in “Further Reading” illustrate the lack of the timeline study and global analysis Professor Stearns has accomplished in the second edition of his book. These sources include A.R. Colon, A History of Childhood; A Socio-Economic Survey, Phillip Ari├Ęs Centuries of Childhood: A Social History of Family Life, and Willem Koops and Michael Zuckerman Beyond the History of the Child: Cultural History and Developmental Psychology. The book contributes to the scholarship in the field by addressing a global perspective against a historical timeline. His chapter “Globalization and childhood” considers the effects of globalization as a “real force,” adding to the factors prompting change in childhood in the years around 2000” (134). Stearns’ work is thus relevant to studies of postmodernism, childhood/family dynamics and marketing aimed towards consumers under the age of eighteen. Stearns makes at least one positive statement about globalization when he writes that globalization meshed with traditional modes of childhood around the world. This blend created “additional common influences” but “globalization” did not erase forms of diversity both old and new” (154). In light of his discussion of globalization creating common influences among children without affecting their diverse, multicultural customs, I was disappointed Stearns did not talk more about the roles dolls and toys play in childhood. Barbie, alone, with her contemporaries in the Moslem world and her myriad costumes, would have been a perfect illustration of a western cultural icon gone global. For example, Stearns discusses the evolving nature of play and its importance from training children to be adults to pure fun and recreation, but he only discusses toys in about eleven pages scattered trough his book. At least toys are listed in his index; dolls are not. Furthermore, in the chapter “Childhood and communist revolutions,” Stearns has a perfect opportunity to discuss the evolving role for toys in the old USSR where children made toys in specialized schools instead of plaything with them (107). Yet, here and elsewhere, Stearns only devotes a few lines to that topic. In “Modern childhood in Asia,” Stearns addresses games and toys for children in Japan and spends two very interesting paragraphs addressing how by the 1920s, Japan had become a major toy exporter. Yet he does not discuss the important role dolls have played for centuries in Japanese culture, where dolls are celebrated in temples devoted to doll cremation, and in Girls and Boys festivals, which involve dolls and miniatures. I expected to find Lea Baten, Alan Pate, and others who have written on Asian dolls in Stearns’ “Further Reading” but they were not there. Dolls and toys in Ancient Greece, Rome and elsewhere were important ritual objects and toys. Their roles evolved within their cultures, but Stearns does not address them. Again, writers such as Max von Boehn, Mary Hillier, Jane Pagter Johl, Helen Young, Laura Starr, Carl Fox, and Winifred Gerin would have been wonderful, relevant sources for is research. Overall, scholars researching the history of play and childhood will find Stearns’ work and interesting survey of how attitudes towards children and childrearing have evolved over time to be very valuable to those who study the nature of play. He should pay more attention to the history of toys, games, and dolls as they relate to early definitions of childhood around the world Ellen M. Tsagaris, J.D., Ph.D. 4 Hillcrest Court Rock Island, IL 61201 309-721-9882 etsag1998@aol.com Take care good doller friends and readers and thanks for following me!

Sunday, June 17, 2012

Sgt. Frog

In this very cute anime cartoon, a group of adorable alien frogs interact with another group of teens. In one episode, the subject is the Hina Festival for young girls. They make fun of the traditional dolls festival and the dolls, and at one point, a group of aliens take over the doll display to "spice it up." The dolls festival is parodied and made fun of, so that one wonders if that tradition, too, is falling by te wayside. I would be interested to know for sure from anyone in Japaln what the status of the festival is today.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Pinterest Doll Collection

We do Pinterest, too; here is one link. http://pinterest.com/etquest/doll-collection/ I also have board on Pets, Photography, Holidays, and Women's Apparel, with more boards to come!

Over 18,000!!

God bless everyone; we are over 18,000 strong!!! Here is a link to our friends at The Haunted Doll Web Museum; they should meet our other friends at Skellington Manor and their Doll Room! Thanks to my dear friend, Rose! JUST FOR YOU ELLEN http://www.hauntedamericatours.com/museum/hauntedDOLL.htm

But, I Love Dolls from Garage Sales . . .!

From Denise's Blog on about; I have everything from the sublime to the ridiculous in my collection, high end, low end, and everything in between, and I have fun, even with my "wrecks" and "misfit dolls:" A Humorous Look At Doll Condition So you grab a doll at a garage sale... By Denise Van Patten, About.com Guide .See More About:doll conditiondoll valuegarage salesbuying dolls One of the hardest things for a new doll collector to learn about is doll condition and how it effects the value of a doll. Additionally, it really helps to learn the various terminology that is used by doll collectors to describe various doll conditions. Yet it is true that the topic can be a bit dry; maybe even a tad boring. So, lets liven things up. Play along with me now. You have just ran into the dreiveway on a property at the opening of a massive garage sale--a garage sale swarmed by way too many participants, thanks to cable television shows about finding treasure among trash, like American Picker, Storage Wars and Pawn Stars. You spy what looks like a box of dolls hiding under a folding table. You grab it, and huddle in the corner looking over your find--a box of vintage dolls! The first doll you pull out is in... 1. Partial Condition The first doll you pull out of the box is...well, not complete. She is missing a leg. Oh, and an arm. She is nude, and looks stepped on in a few places. A doll like this isn't much use, and doesn't have much value. This condition is alternatively known as "Dog Chew Toy." However, look closely before you toss the doll aside. Perhaps she has a good limb that could be a replacement for a bad limb for a doll at home. Or, although the doll body is trashed, perhaps the doll is rare and the head is good. In any event, this doll missing major parts doesn't even add up to a doll in poor condition. Ads Collectors Stores Search Businesses At Local.com For Collectors Stores Near You! Local.com MasterPiece Dolls Offering a large selection at great prices. Secure ordering & layaway! www.samanthasdolls.com Robert Tonner Dolls 2010 Collection, Many Retired Dolls Layaways, Discounts, Secure Site www.twodaydreamers.com 2. Poor Condition The second doll you pull out of the box at least isn't missing any major parts! Hmm...but on a closer inspection, you see that she is missing about half her eyelashes. And her hair has been drastically cut. Her face paint has worn away in places, her dress in tatters and her eyes are stuck. This doll is in poor condition; a condition that only a mother could love, and indeed, the child that was the mother to this doll loved her rather well. Unless this doll is the rarest of the rare, it will have very little value. Disappointed, you throw the doll aside and reach for the next doll in the box. 3. Fair Condition This doll is also well loved. You figure that with lots of love and attention, she might be made presentable. She has all her hair, although its matted and dirty and in need of a wash and set. She has part of her original outfit, but not all of it, and again, it needs help--a few stitches for tears and a wash. There is lots of surface dirt, but it should come off with attention. If the doll is plastic, it might have some dings and scratches. If the doll is composition, it probably has some crazing and cracking. The doll is in fair condition; not up to the standards of most collectors, and a definite project for someone who wants a bargain and doesn't ming quite a bit of elbow grease. This person isn't you, so, sadly, you also toss this doll aside. 4. Good Condition The next doll is, well, OK. No major flaws, but she is played with. She has all of her original costume, but it is somewhat faded and needs freshening up. She is, however, missing a shoe. Her hair is all there, but really messy. She has a few minor flaws, maybe a lazy eye, maybe a mark on her back. This doll is in good condition. If she were a hard-to-find or rare doll, you would definitely buy her. But, she is a very common Barbie doll, so, again, you throw her on the reject pile and move on. 5. Excellent Condition Ooh...now we are talking! The next doll out of the box looks vey nice! All her clothes are there, there are two shoes, hair is in the original set. Her face paint looks fresh and has not rubbed off. She has been played with, but carefully. The doll has tight joints and holds a good pose. She doesn't look as good as the day she came out of the doll shop, and she doesn't have her box or tags, but she is a good doll that most doll collectors would accept for their collection. This doll is in excellent condition. Since she is a somewhat hard-to-find early 1950s hard plastic doll, you decide to inquire about the price. This doll goes into the keeper pile! 6. Mint Condition As you take the next doll out of the box, you marvel at how the dolls just keep getting better and better. This doll does look like the day she came out of the store--she has her hair in her original set, the outift is crisp and fresh and bright and complete, her face is bright. This is the type of doll that all collectors look for! This doll is in mint condition! And, since she is an early composition doll, you put her in your purchase pile too! 7. MOC Condition The next doll is just as mint as the last doll, with the added feature of being still attached to the original card the doll was sold on! The doll was originally sold in a plastic bubble on a card--you prefer dolls in boxes, but this small Liddle Kiddle doll was never sold that way. This condition is MOC, also known as "mint on card". 8. MIB Condition Towards the bottom of the box is a lovely, completely mint doll, in her original box! She, again, is just as mint as the last two dolls. She is a ponytail barbie doll, sold in lift-off cover boxes. Again, you are thrilled to find this MIB doll, also known as "mint in box." Ads Rare Coins Value Buy Exceptional, Rare U.S. Coins Online. PCGS & NGC. Est. 1975 Coins.BlanchardOnline.com Ashton-Drake Galleries™ Collectible Dolls - Official Site! Limited-Edition Exclusive Dolls www.AshtonDrake.com 9. NRFB Condition The next doll is a slightly later Twist And Turn Barbie doll that comes in a factory sealed box! You can see that not only was this doll never played with, but she was never out of the box at all--in fact, you are dancing up and down, because the doll looks like the day she came out of the store. You are holding a NRFB doll, also known as never removed from box. You now jealously guard your pile at the garage sale from others trying to take some of these great dolls away from you. You reach into the box to take out the final doll... 10. Mint, Pristine, All-Original, Original Hang Tag The final doll blows you away. Not only has this amazing early Madame Alexander doll never been out of her original box, but she is as pristine mint as you have ever seen this particular doll to be. She has all original packaging, and hang tags. The doll looks like it just came off the factory line! No store shelf wear and tear on the box of this doll! This doll condition is called the Jackpot condition! You grab your dolls and run to the table to check out, hoping you can argue the homeowner down to about $10 each! Related Articles •Barbie Collecting Terminology and Definitions •Barbie Collecting Terminology and Definitions - Doll Collecting •Dolls Price Guide: Chatty Cathy •Prices Realized: Shirley Temple Dolls •The Garage Sale Hunt - Finding Dolls at Garage Sales Denise Van Patten Doll Collecting Guide Sign up for My Newsletter HeadlinesForum....Ads Gold Could Hit $10,000/oz What Are The Banks Trying To Hide? Download This Free Secret Report. USMoneyReserve.com Selling Gold? Sell Gold at the Highest Price. Find Top Gold Buying Companies. smarter.com/SellGold Vintage Effanbee Doll Huge selection of Vintage Effanbee Doll items. Yahoo.com Advertisement Doll Collecting Ads •Doll Collectors •Barbie Doll •Love Doll •Collectible Doll •Dress Up Cartoon Doll .Related Searches vintage dolls doll body doll collector doll collectors folding table huddle

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

In memory of Suzanne Gibson

My friend Suzanne Gibson passed away in 2010. She was from California, but was living in Richmond when we began to correspond. I was lucky enough to have one of her pocelain Little Girl Dolls in my collection, and she emailed me a photo of a sister doll, and sent me an autographed copy of her book about The Kalico Kids. The little girl has always been a favorite of mine; my dad paid $47.50 for her in 1970 in Knotts Berry Farm; he says his hand still hurts. The legend was that the doll was only made three times, then Suzanne broke the mould. She neither confirmed nor denied this claim. She was a member of NIADA, and I was thrilled to have this doll, especially since I was barely ten. Later, I added a vinyl Kalico Kid, and many years later, another. These look porcelain and are excellent. My mom and I bought other Reeves Internationa dolls by Suzanne, and she liked it when I kept track of the prices her dolls were bringing. Her website is still up, and there arem ore storeis about her. R. Lane Herron has a good article about her in Spinning Wheel's complete book of dolls, Ed. Albert Christian Revi. Here are some photos of dolls in my collection. I miss her, and think of her often. She was a trained ballerina, and her dolls are always graceful and haunting. It was an honor to have known her.

Sunday, June 10, 2012

Digital Puppetry

Go to lwn TV if you ahve it, on e/i; it's the old retro tv station. The Henson/muppeteers are on, and explained how puppets are no manipulateed and created s digital images, literally, no strings attached. We've come a long way from Kukla, Fran, and Ollie [And Kukla's name is dolly in Greek!]. What would Shari Lewis and my Lamchop think?! Claymation may be the forerunner of this technology, as are te cypber paper dolls out there. What next? Bunraku and shadow puppets are early ancestors of this technology as well. A good cite, puppetry.com.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Metal Head Huret

I am looking for photos and information about this doll that belogned to Maureen Popp and Dorothy Dixon at one time. I am also interested in buying such a doll. I hope someone can help me!

More Metal Doll Musings

I came upon photos at the Library of Congresss, loc.gov, of a metal toy factory that was converted to make bombs during w WWII. I started wondering if Metal dolls and heads, as well as other metal toys, were melted down to aid during the Wars. Would anyone out there know? Also, my reading has taken me to the Ancient World, where many, many more dolsl and figurines thatn Ic an imagine were made in bronze, gold, silver, etc. in Ancient America, Egypt, Greece, Africa, and Sumeria. I feel a third edition of the book coming on!

Memoirs of a Doll Collector; Indiana Antqiues

There are so many places I visited for antique dolls as a child that I think I would have to spend the rest of my life documenting them. One legendary place was Indiana Antiques which was once on 2nd Street in San Jose. They used to advertise in Hobbies, and they were the place for antique dolls, though at one time, they were incredibly pricey. I thought of them yesterday when I got to visit my friend R., who is a big doll enthusiast, too. She has a fantastic collection and is always glad to share. I couldn't do the Museum Doll Day trip this year, or Convention, so I got a sneak pick at her exhibits. Indiana Antiques had room after room of French and German dolls, cases of large, black Frozen Charlottes with elaborate hairdos, China heads that stood nearly four feet, K and H storybook dolls in their upside down jars, mint. One of these came home with me one time, along with a tiny all bisque, probably French, with fantastic yellow soled boots. My uncle followed the "me no tell" policy that New Years Eve of 1973, because my mother paid nearly $30.00 for her. I went back in the late 80s, and bought a Minerva head, still in "mold" stage, and a china head that had survived the 1906SF earthquake. There were still dolls, but the fancy high end items and K and H dolls, which had their start in Santa Clara with Peg O' My Heart dolls, were gone. I also saw a pumpkin head restored by Lewis Sorenson, another Bay Area doll celeb and member of NIADA [My friend Suzanne Gibson of Capitola and I think Dewees Cochrane were others. My friend Mr. R. Lane Herron lived in San Francisco, too]. There were other antique stores with great tiny bisques nearby, and one with many vintage compos and HCs across the street, which were gone. The story behind IN antiques was a sad one; allegedly, the parents of the original owner were running the shop in the 80s; their daughter, original collector and founder, died young. I threw that story in my parents' faces when I wanted sympathy. My dad just said he would set up at the flea market. Great. There were other stores in El Paseo Saratoga, and one across the street from it, that had antique dolls and foreign dolls. My Floradora came from one, and my all metal Chelsea miniature peg doll from another. India Imports had Shackman dolls and beautiful international dolls at the Town and Country Shopping Center, and Pixie Toys in our neck of the woods had Madame Alexanders, Corolle, and HP mini German babies with wicker furniture. Vann's Craft and Hobby had beaucoup doll supplies and vintage coins and stamps as well, Woolworths had dolls and doll clothes, and Walgreens featured the largest collection of Bradley Collectors dolls I'd ever seen. Mark Farmer was in El Cerrito, which was just fantastic. There were Doll Hospitals and Antique stores all over San Jose, and of course, the San Jose Flea Market, where my Arranbe Littlest Angel and I first met. I think we could have had a Bonnie Babe that year for very little. There were old dolls in San Juan Bautista, inclusing bisque dolls and Santos on display, and one woman had a doll museum as part of her shop. She had a cabinet size Eden Bebe, and a Col. Sanders! I wish I new what haappened to her. We used to go to Goodwill, and to the Barn Flea Market outside Monterrey, and of course, to Chinatown, where I would find vintage and old dolls from Japan. Macy's, Magic Kingdom, Bullocks, Emporium, Valentine's Ladies, Gumps, Nice Twice Doll Shop, were all in business. They all had great doll departments. Celebrity Imports had them, as did Pool, Patio ant Things at Christmas. Kiddie World hosted artist doll shows. I lost out a mechanical Petitcolin one year at the Velco Village flea market to my friend Michael Canadas who took over The Carmel Doll shop from a family that hailed from Illinois, same town I lived in. I made up for it with antique Japanese Ningyo bought for a song. Collecting and collectors have evolved, as well they should, but the magic for me was those early childgood/adolescent yars hunting in California with my family, and travelling and seeing wonderful things along the way.

June 23d Auction

From Theriaults: Collectors agree that it’s fun and easy to bid at Theriault’s auctions via the internet. Sitting on the patio, iced tea in hand, mellow breezes wafting by, listening to the auction, and pressing that BID button when it’s time to bid. It’s easy, it’s fun, BUT... BUT what about the most fun of all? Actually being at the auction. Looking at all those beautiful dolls and choosing your favorites up-close and personal. The fun of people-watching. Guessing which dolls will be the crowd favorites, and who will bid on what. Balancing a box of take-out lunch while trying to bid. And, yes, the actual fun of bidding in person and the thrill with others cheering you on when you win. Then later, a nice lunch on the way home, reminiscing about the fun of the day, and the dolls you just won right there with you. Going to the auction is like a day at the beach. Just a day to get away from it all. So why not bring the fun back? We say turn off the computer, grab the car keys, call a collector friend or two, and come on down for a day of dolls. Theriault’s June 23 auction offers over 300 antique and vintage dolls to suit every collector’s tastes. A beautiful collection of dolls from an English estate is highlighted, including French bisque bebes and poupees, along with other wonderful German bisque dolls, Schoenhuts, early cloth and paper mache dolls, cloth studio dolls from the 1930s, teddy bears, doll costumes and accessories, toys, and all childhood ephemera that you love to find. For more information about the auctions click here or telephone 800-638-0422 or email info@theriaults.com or stuart@theriaults.com. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Someone Splendid This Way Came: Rest in Peace Ray ...

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: Someone Splendid This Way Came: Rest in Peace Ray ...: He died yesterday at 91; his books will live forever. How right he was with, or "write" with Farenheit 451; here we are with blue tooths an...

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: The Secret Life of Objects

Memoir; Writing your Life Story: The Secret Life of Objects: This book by Dawn Raffel reminds me of Anne Rice's Teh Wtiching hour because she talks about how simple objects can invoke feelings, or seem...

Miss Charlotte Bronte meets Miss Barbara Pym: Remarkable Creatures; Debt as Necessity

Miss Charlotte Bronte meets Miss Barbara Pym: Remarkable Creatures; Debt as Necessity: This is a remarkable novel by the author of The Girl with the Pearl Earring. It is about the lives of Mary Anningand Elzabath Philpot, self...

Monday, June 4, 2012

Doll Museum: Welcome

Doll Museum: Welcome: I would like to welcome my new follower, and to thank all my followers for reading my blog, and for putting up with my typing challenges, do...

Doll Museum: Welcome

Doll Museum: Welcome: I would like to welcome my new follower, and to thank all my followers for reading my blog, and for putting up with my typing challenges, do...

Friday, June 1, 2012

Summer fun for Doll Lovers and Other Collectors

I enjoy the About.com blogs and newsletters on hobbies and collectibles. Denise van Patten does more than a decent job of writing about dolls, and sends out the newsletter faithfully. Below are her ideas repeated here for your pleasure for collecting. I also recommend her price guide; the introduction is "meaty" and interesting, and the guide/photos realistic. I would add to her ideas travel to look for doll additions on trips, surf the net for research files, paper dolls, and free publications like The Smithsonian's Booklet on Caring for Native American Dolls and their history, visit web museums, cruis the rummage sales, thrift shops and yard sales, dress and repair your dolls, and make a wish list. Rearrange your doll houses. Organize dolls for charity as an event, and let Doll Castle News know what you are doing. Mr. Mueller, editor, also has ideas for where you can send items. Finally, work out a doll/collectible budget for the year. See More About:doll conventionsdoll shows displaying dollsorganizing dolls It's summertime, summertime, sum, sum, summertime....and you've got some time off! Or, lots of time off. Or, no time off and you need to make the most of your weekends. In any event, it's the lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer and you are looking for some doll-related activites to enrich your summer and your collecting. Well, you've come to the right place; I've got some great suggestions for places to go, events to attend and things to do for doll collectors to make the most of those great, fleeting, wonderful months of Summer. 1. Attend the National Barbie Doll Collectors Convention! Every year, a large national Barbie Doll Collector's convention is held! The very first national Barbie Doll Collector's Convention was held in 1980 (over 30 years ago!) with roughly 100 participants. Today, the conventions generally have about 1000 participants and are held in cities all across the United States. This year, the theme is “Grand Tour”, [where participants will be] traveling the world, learning about themselves as well as new cultures and people. They experienced the sights, sounds and tastes of foreign lands, and they brought back exotic souvenirs from their travels as well as memories that lasted a lifetime." The convention will be held July 11th through the 14th in Garden Grove, California. and registrations are still available. 2. Attend the United Federation of Doll Clubs National Convention! There is even a doll convention that is much older than the Barbie doll convention--the United Federation of Doll Clubs ("UFDC") National Convention! This summer marks the 63rd year for the UFDC Convention. This convention celebrates dolls of all types, from antiques to modern. with an emphasis on antique and vintage dolls, but with many meal events and activities planned for modern dolls as well. This year, the theme is "A Jambalaya Jubilee," and the convention will be held from July 24th through July 27th, in New Orleans, Louisiana. As with nearly all conventions mentioned here, there will be doll salesrooms, doll competitions, doll workshops, doll seminars, doll-themed meals, doll souvenirs and much more. 3. Go To Doll Shows! Even if you can't travel far and and wide to get to a doll convention, or if a doll convention is not in your budget, you can easily find a doll show within driving distance. Thanks to the internet, doll shows are not as plentiful as they were back in the 1990s, but there are still many of them around. And, there is nothing like a doll show, where you can see and touch dolls, and meet doll collectors and dealers. Some doll shows even have doll workshops and seminars. There are many lists of upcoming doll shows on the Internet, including a good, up-to-date list from Jones Publishing, publishers of Dolls magazine and Teddy Bear Review. 4. Visit Doll Museums and Doll Shops Unfortunately, many great doll shops and museums have closed during the current economic downturn. However, there are still many great ones left to see. If there are doll museums or doll shops in your area, support them by paying a visit, and/or taking summer house guests to see them! If you are traveling, research on the internet to find doll museums and shops that you can visit during your trips. Be sure to call ahead for summer hours and to ensure that the source you are using to find the doll museums and shops is up-to-date. 5. Attend a Ball-Jointed Doll Covention! There are so many doll conventions; the ones listed here are just a sampling of the ones available. One of the most current and growing areas of doll collecting is ball-jointed dolls. If you are new to ball-jointed dolls, or already a fan, there is no better way to learn about different types or customizing the dolls than to attend a convention. One of the ball-jointed doll conventions being held this summer is the Ball Jointed Doll Collector's Convention 2012 in Austin, Texas. The convention will be held from August 2nd through August 4th, with a theme of The Enchanted Sea (includes all sea related topics from Merpeople (Mermaids) to Pirates). Registrations are still available. 6. Organize Your Doll Collection If you don't feel like traveling this summer, there are many doll-related projects that can be done at home. If you are facing the dog days of summer, and the outside temperature is broiling, why not stay indoors with you air-conditioned doll collection and an iced tea? While there, you can spend the time organizing your doll collection--culling out dolls to sell or give away, getting your records together for insurance, perhaps sewing (or purchasing) outfits for dolls that need them, etc. There are many things you can do that can spruce up your collection, and those summer days off are perfect for time off to do them! 7. Re-Display Your Doll Collection If your doll collection is already organized, then it is always fun to re-display your doll collection! Summer is a time for houseguests, and especially if you are having friends old or new visit you or stay at your house, attention to your doll displays prior to their visit can re-invigorate any collection. If you have a guest room, perhaps adding a few dolls on a shelf or in a corner can be a delightful touch as well. 8. Start a Doll Club! It's summertime and you and your doll friends are bored. So, start a doll club! All a club really needs is a monthly hour or two meeting each month to get started, and a few doll friends willing to share their love of dolls and help educate each other. You are probably already hanging out with your doll collecting friends anyway, so why not take your colleting and doll friendships to the next step? 9. Attend the Modern Doll Collector's Convention Yes, I know....one more doll convention to tell you about. This one actually wraps up the summer, as it is held at the tail-end of summer; this year, from September 19 through September 22, in Las Vegas, Nevada. As the title suggests, this convention celebrates modern dolls of all types. The convention doll this year will be from Kish and Company. Another long-standing convention, this convention has been held for over 30 years! 10. Read a Good Doll Book So much great information exists about dolls, and everyone complains about so little time to absorb it all. Or, everyone sits around plastered to their computers and ipads. It's summer! Go outside, soak up some sun, and bring a good book about dolls with you! You'll get a great tan, and some Vitamin D, and everything you learn while reading about dolls will help make you a better collector when the cold days of Fall arrive. Suggested Reading